A Letter From The CEO

Finding ways to succeed inherently motivates me – whether it is waging war in a tennis match, writing a short story for a contest, attacking to win a bike race, or continuing to evolve a training system for endurance athletes.

In high school, I wrestled and played baseball, and those were indifferent times, just going with the flow. In college, I discovered tennis and an instinctual wolf drive I’d never felt before. I won tennis matches at a high level and became a champion in something for the first time in my life. I didn’t have to think about training — the motivation was down to the bone, it just pulled me there.

In college, I found a good groove, away from the court spending heavy amounts of timing honing my craft as a writer. I won the university writing contest – won it four years straight. I was lost in an abstract realm of creative thinking and writing, living life in the university. I had never felt so alive, creating success from nothing, this was not easy – getting an idea and putting it to paper, generating something real that people acknowledged as a prize. As tennis’ luster faded and I contemplated a writing career, I mindlessly took to cycling to stay fit, to see if it could re-awaken any tennis aspiration.

The bike completely took over my life, from riding to group rides to racing to winning to dreaming.

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Cycling engulfed my final two years of college and instead of searching for a job upon graduation with a B.A. in English, I was already searching for ways to race my bicycle at the very highest level. Searching for nirvana success on the bike became a vortex for twelve full years of my life.

During the first seven years, I was just a pure bike racer looking for ways to breed speed. Training with power was automatic and I was one of the first riders to both embrace power and benefit from it. Off the bike, I quickly was able to coach many athletes because of my understanding of the critical metric: wattage. With this immersive experience, I created a viable training system for endurance athletes, and by 2008 I was able to quit my day job and coach full-time.

Today, I generate raw velocity profiles for athletes. I find and predict patterns in your personal power curve based off Elite Endurance blueprint data, and I sync all parts of the engine to perform at both optimal and maximal velocity for your peak event. I do it constantly.

Training is an art. You have the physical engine, and also the mental side. The most important part of the coach-athlete relationship is that your coach fully understands how to extract the best out of you. And his métier is helping athletes discover something rare – full potential.

Letter-From-CEO---subimage-(within-text)editedThe drive to succeed doesn’t mean winning – the drive comes from something much deeper, something more primal – to push yourself to new places, always succeeding but never arriving.

I inherently believe Elite Endurance Training Systems athletes receive the best coaching service in the country. #1.

Last year, 150+ wins, 1 national champion, 2 silver medals, 15+ State Champions, many series champions, endless podiums, countless medals. You can add up all the coaches in the state, add up all their results – the tally wouldn’t come close to half of what we do. Not even close.

And that’s just the racing side.

In life, you feel like you arrive when you are doing something important – in that moment you don’t feel like doing anything else, and that is exactly how I feel when I am sitting in this chair, tuned into the wavelength that is creating workout schedules and learning about athletes.

Cycling and endurance sports are my life: what started with online coaching has evolved into a unique training system, to building a regional presence, to offering training programs to athletes around the world, to designing and running in-person training events and practices, to being the director of a champion cyclocross team – all of it begins with relationships we have built with individual athletes and our belief that coaching should be personal.

Sincerely,

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